jerry mason's Posts (37)

Leave A Tribute To Denise Lasalle

We Have Opened Up Our Contact Line For Friends and Fans Of Denise Lasalle to Call In and Leave A Verbal Tribute To The Queen Of The Blues !!! All Tributes Will be Shared With Radio and Music Sites as well as Social Networks.

If You Would Like To Leave A Tribute Just Dial The Contact Line At 1-800-378-8141 ext 1,and Leave Your Comment

Don't Forget To include your name  and City Radio Folks Feel Free To Mention Your Call Signs 

Thanks

Read more…

In Remembrance Of Kenny Hamilton

By Cassie CJ Fox
Southern Soul-Blues Music and Radio lost a huge fan and supporter,this past October 12.and his name was Kenny Hamilton. Kenny fought and lost his recent battle with cancer. Known in his hey day as "Montreal Kenny" to the people and press of Montreal Quebec, Kenny was an outstanding Rhythm and Blues Vocalist, who was remembered on vinyl and live performance,for his strong,rich voice,his intense and emotional delivery style. Kenny,born in Dayton,Ohio,started singing professionally at age of 10. In the mid-Sixties he moved  to Montreal to embark in the Soul ,and Music theater scene. He was a main stay and the iconic Esquire Club, in Montreal,where many touring American Soul, Rhythm and Blues acts performed as it was the hot spot for gritty soul rooted in American Southern sounds. Kenny was also known in Montreal and other provinces for his friendly,likeable persona,his warmth,easy going personality and sense of humor. Some of his entertainment peers and friends refer to him as the "Gentle Giant In The Canadian Music Industry for being an honest,approachable man,with good intentions"and for being a loyal,true friend,to so may.
Being the all around entertainer he was,Kenny also starred in Montreal's musical theater version of the musical " Hair " as well as guest roles on television and radio.
Kenny stated that his singing chops and style was heavily influenced by American music,rooted in the church,gospel and blues, that were mainly recorded in the Southern United States. At age 14, he said he heard for the first time,the crystal 50,000 watt clear channel AM radio signal from station WLAC in Nashville,  where nightime on-air personality  known as "John R" John Richbourg, played Soul,Rhythm and Blues,sponsored by several record stores. Hearing vocalists such Otis Redding,Percy Sledge,O.V.Wright,Bobby Blue Bland,Wilson Pickett,Ray Charles,Johnnie Taylor,Ollie Nightengale for the first time,Kenny was hooked on the authenticity,emotional urgency in the singers voices,along with their Southern Accents. In recent years,Kenny said he was "Thrilled to find internet and streaming radio where I Can  listen to my beloved Southern Rooted Music." He stated "I Love Everything about Southern Soul Music from the classics to the current newbie younger artists Of Southern Soul-Blues.He added" The dance and party jams to the ballads,I cannot get enough" He loved it-the Southern Music and Culture,so much, he joined The Boogie Report and WMPR-FM's website profiles. 
Kenny was inspired by the recent sounds and in the last two years,he made trips to the studio, where he laid down vocals with other artists for group gospel songs and soul.R&B.His final recordings ,were made within the last three to four months, between his routine of rest, medication changes,doctor visits,as the cancer took it toll on his body and voice. His final recording,"Knockdown" a soul mid tempo,epitaph as some call it. The vocals were recorded his his hospital room, surrounded by his wife Dale,his family and friends just hours before he left for his final journey. We Thank Kenny for loving and supporting American Southern Soul Music,embracing Southern Culture,as we  send our prayers and best wishes to Kenny's family and friends. 
Read more…

A funny thing happened on the way to the Promised Land.

For years, blues lovers dreamed of the day when we could celebrate together, without regard for the small-minded prejudices that for so long made it impossible to celebrate freely. A lot of folks still remember the way it used to be, especially in the South. Musicians risked their lives if they toured in integrated buses. Even sharing a stage might touch off a riot – white musicians who sat in with black bands, or black sidemen who accompanied a white headliner, sometimes had to play hidden behind a curtain. Some clubs had a rope running down the middle of the floor, separating the races. On a good night the rope might eventually get pulled down and everyone would dance together – a harbinger of a liberated new world yet to come.

White kids who bought blues records or listened to the blues on the radio in the ‘40s, ‘50s, and early ‘60s might be punished by their parents, ridiculed by their peers, and lectured by their clergy. Racist organizations like the White Citizens’ Council of Alabama urged white communities to boycott stores that sold “Negro records,” lest the “savage” rhythms and “screaming, idiotic words” corrupt the lily-white purity of Caucasian youth. Their efforts succeeded all too well: black artists who enjoyed household-name status among black listeners were, for the most part, virtually unknown to whites. About the only way a black blues or R&B artist could have a “mainstream” hit was for a white artist to record a cover version, and even then the royalties and recognition seldom made it back to the source. “Separate and unequal” was the unwritten law of the land, and it was replicated in the world of music.

We’ve come a long way since then – in fact, in many ways we’ve come full-circle. Not only do many modern blues festivals, concerts, awards ceremonies, and clubs look like an integrationist’s dream; these days “color-blindness” has come to mean insisting that white musicians not be discriminated against (if that’s not an oxymoron) on the blues stage, on the radio show, or in the critical commentary. What used to be called black music – blues, jazz, R&B, even rap and hip-hop – is seldom even called that any more. Living Blues Magazine, the oldest continuous blues-based periodical in the U.S., has in recent years come under increasing fire for its insistence to remain –as its masthead proclaims– “The Journal Of The Afro-American Blues Tradition.” A newer magazine, Blues Revue, has pointedly flaunted its putative “color-blind” policy by billing itself as "The Blues Resource for All of America;" its masthead now proclaims it "The World's Blues Magazine." Guitarist Bob Margolin, a white musician who played for years in the Muddy Waters band, has written a column for Blues Revue that has expanded and elaborated on the argument that the blues – and music in general – has no intrinsic “color” or “ethnicity” (at least not anymore), and should be listened to and appreciated in that spirit. Another white guitarist, Elvin Bishop, titled one of his CDs The Skin I’m In as a pointed jab –really, a gauntlet thrown down – to those who’d question his authenticity as a bluesman.

And it’s all, of course, going on in the name of the most well-meaning and progressive social agendas – after all, isn’t this what “diversity” is supposed to be about? Just as long-neglected black artists received at least a modicum of their due in the newly enlightened atmosphere of the ‘60s and ‘70s, many whites– session musicians, songwriters, even some front-line entertainers – are now being acknowledged for the contributions they’ve been making to blues and R&B for decades.

Alongside these developments, though, there’s a rising tide of opinion suggesting that something precious is being lost – or even stolen. Where some see integration, others see dilution; where some praise colorblind diversity, others charge cultural imperialism. It’s not merely an academic issue: on bandstands, in the media, and among friends, battle lines are being drawn, accusations being made.
Artists find themselves caught between ideological camps. White musicians who genuinely love the blues and play it with integrity and heart feel as if they’re being treated as interlopers or even cultural thieves; they feel as if they’re being asked, unfairly, to pay dues for the sins of the past. On the other side of the divide, African American musicians who proclaim the ethnic and cultural identity of their art are sometimes accused of “reverse racism” and knee-jerk Afrocentrism. But if they incorporate pop and rock influences into their styles, or work in integrated bands, they’re open to charges of selling out. Critics and journalists, as well as the publications for which they work, may be labeled racist, regardless of which side they take in the debate.

Name-calling gets us nowhere, of course. But in a world where a handful of (white-dominated) corporations control virtually everything we see on television, hear, and read; where national debates rage over multiculturalism, bilingualism, Ebonics, and “identity politics”; where Third World countries and even European nations such as France are beginning to resent the intrusion of American mass culture that threatens the survival of cherished traditions and values – in such a world, idealistic visions of “free choice” and sharing cannot be separated from issues of equity and justice. To portray contemporary American race and class relations as equal – even in the music world– is disingenuous at best. It obscures very real inequities in power – inequities that threaten to weaken, if not destroy, the cultural and historical context in which the blues has developed over the years.

This is not to deny, of course, that any artist with integrity and talent can create music of merit, regardless of his or her cultural background. The issue at hand has nothing to do with whether or not individuals can transcend cultural barriers; it’s not about who has a “right” to play the blues, or whether the music of Jonny Lang, the North Mississippi Allstars, or the late Stevie Ray Vaughan is “authentic.” After all, some of the most vital and lasting music of the 20th Century was created by artists who melded their own cultural heritages with elements drawn from diverse traditions. Think, for instance, of African-American divas Marian Anderson and Leontyne Price performing European classical music alongside traditional Negro spirituals and folk songs; Paul Robeson singing Broadway show tunes, Hasidic chants and German lieder; Ray Charles and Aretha Franklin reinterpreting the works of pop songwriters like Paul Simon or Lennon and McCartney (who themselves drank deeply from multicultural wells); Elvis Presley and Carl Perkins fusing country music and blues into rock & roll.

What’s going on in the blues these days, however, represents something different and ominous. It has to do with the belief, which seems to be held by many “mainstream” observers (including most critics and more than a few musicians), that music somehow exists in a realm of its own, separate from any historical or social context. There’s a movement, fueled in large part by the corporate entertainment industry, to redefine the blues as “just notes”or “just a feeling,” devoid of any social, cultural, or historical implications beyond the vapidly rebellious (and aggressively adolescent) stance we’ve come to associate with rock & roll.

This is, in many ways, a new phenomenon. In 1956, no less an authority than Elvis reminded his public that ”the colored folks have been singing and playing it just like I’m doing now, man, for more years than I know. I got it from them.” Throughout his life Elvis went out of his way to pay credit to Arthur Crudup, Fats Domino, Jackie Wilson, and other African-American artists who had inspired him and served as musical role models (and he also put his money where his curled-up mouth was, contributing generously to Wilson’s medical care after Jackie was felled by a stroke.)

Later in the ‘60s, at least some white blues-rockers made at least a tacit effort to recognize their debt to living African-American culture, as well as to the individual artists they emulated. When the Rolling Stones embarked on their first U.S. tour, they insisted on showcasing Chicago blues legend Howlin’ Wolf on their first American television appearance; when Memphis-born harmonica player Charlie Musselwhite moved to Chicago in the ‘60s, he settled on the South Side, in the same community as the African-American blues musicians whom he idolized. Admittedly, such cultural cross-pollinations sometimes manifested themselves in self-conscious “blue-eyed soul brother” posing; at their best, however, they resulted in music that borrowed, with respect and honesty, from a wide palette of sources and influences, and in doing so created sounds that were vibrant and of lasting artistic importance. (And in many cases, the artists never forgot where the music came from: In 1976, when The Band performed their famous “Last Waltz” farewell concert at Winterland in San Francisco, someone associated with the project tried to cut Muddy Waters from the bill. Drummer Levon Helm was ouitraged: he stated that if Muddy wasn’t going to appear, neither would he. He personally forced the “suits” to include Muddy, his friend and mentor, on the show.)

The diminution of this perspective has been so gradual, and so insidious, that casual observers may not even realize how pervasive it has been. After all, most people still affirm that the earliest blues artists were African-American, and that their music evolved from traditions that extended back to slavery and to Africa before that. We take it as a given that this music led directly to electrified blues, R&B, and rock & roll. We even acknowledge that many of the social and cultural elements of what might be termed “the blues life” are rooted in historical and social conditions that have been experienced by African-Americans from the earliest days of bondage into the modern era.

But that’s “history” – and in America, when we say something is history we usually mean it’s a dead issue. Today, when contemporary white blues artists like Margolin or harpist Jerry Portnoy acknowledge their debt to a mentor like Muddy Waters or Big Walter Horton, it’s usually understood that they’re referring to an individual who happens to have been African American. Considerations such as the historical, social, and cultural milieu in which this individual lived; the role this milieu played in how this individual developed his or her art; the function of this art as a cultural expression within an indigenous (and oppressed) community; and the ways in which this expression was received, understood, and eventually appropriated by the dominant culture, are seldom considered. The problem is not, in other words, that nobody remembers where the
blues came from; rather, where the blues came from has been redefined and individualized to a point of almost total abstraction.

This willfully ignores a reality that a lot of whites still don’t want to confront: the relationship of Euro-American culture to most other cultures has historically been exploitative and imperialist. More to the point, this basic power imbalance has not changed; it continues to inform the allegedly “free” exchange of values and ideas that proponents of color-blind blues would have us believe exists today. You can’t have “freedom” without equality, and equality entails more than the bromides of well-meaning individuals who call each other “brothers and sisters” in recording studios or on stage.

Social equality (or inequality) occurs among groups –races, classes, genders, etc.– and must be understood and addressed on that level. A few Marian Andersons or Leontyne Prices don’t threaten anyone’s cultural status quo – no one is about to forget the European roots of opera. But, perhaps through no intentional fault of their own, a generation or two of corporate-sponsored white blues artists, with well-greased access to media and dollars, now threaten to obscure the historical and cultural significance of a music created, and still played, largely by people who do not share equally in the access to the means of cultural production and dissemination.

The imperialist overtones become more obvious when we consider that even as the music industry itself has moved away from acknowledging indigenous African-American culture as the original and still-fertile birthing ground of blues expression, others have rushed in to appropriate this culture and transform it into a commodity. Chambers of Commerce, local governments, and travel agencies have cashed in on blues “authenticity” by promoting blues tours and pub crawls into areas and neighborhoods they would otherwise advise white people to avoid at all costs. Camera-toting tourists now regularly show up at “exotic” venues ranging from backwoods Mississippi jukes too after-hours joints on the west side of Chicago, hungry for a taste of the thrilling and forbidden “real thing.” You almost expect the tour guides to be decked out in safari suits and pith helmets.

With all that going on, it seems disingenuous to then claim that the blues has somehow become a “color-blind” art form with no significant ties to a particular cultural heritage or living tradition. There may be nothing quite so cool as a Saturday night at the ol’ juke joint, but after we get back home (or safely back inside the white-owned nightclub that sponsored the tour), it seems that it suddenly becomes racist (or at least ethnocentric) to suggest that there’s something specific to the African-American experience that gave rise to the music we heard there.

The phenomenon isn’t limited to the blues, of course, and it’s possible that as it begins to be felt among what remains of other indigenous living cultures, we may see more widespread resistance to some of its more unfortunate effects. In recent years, for instance, Klezmer music –the improvisational ensemble playing that evolved out of the Jewish shtetls and ghettos of the late 19th and early 20th centuries– has become trendy. At present, everyone seems happy about this development. Jews are proud that this rich and soul-stirring musical heritage has found wider acceptance; everyone else is delighted to have discovered a new lode of aesthetic and emotional uplift. But if, in a decade or so, the Klezmer scene becomes dominated by a bunch of red-haired Irish kids named Duffy who name their bands “Little Moishe and the Lower East Side Bagel Kings,” pose for CD covers in front of Kosher delis sporting newsboy caps and dark glasses, and persist in telling interviewers that this music is, after all, “just notes” or “just a feeling” that anyone can play, the Jewish community may rightfully begin to wonder what’s being appropriated, what’s being defiled, and what remains for them to celebrate and honor as their own.

Likewise, if current trends continue, the very notion of the blues as the cultural expression of a particular people who lived and created their art in a particular historical epoch will have evaporated within a generation or two.

Again, this doesn’t mean that any kind of music or art is, or should be, off limits to anyone. But it also means that if we’re to understand and appreciate it with honesty and integrity, we need to acknowledge and pay tribute to the true cultural meaning and context of art. In other words, let’s learn to celebrate music as a manifestation of living history, as an expression not only of individuals but of the cultural and historical experiences they and their ancestors have shared. Let those of us who are blessed with the privilege of being received as honored guests in a culture not our own embrace this privilege with humility and grace as well as with creativity and innovation. Let us always strive to honor the spirit, the history, and the meaning behind the music, not just the “feelings” and the notes. Let’s not propagate cultural dilution –or, at its most extreme, cultural genocide– disguised as integration and color-blind liberalism.
Attachments area

Read more…

A funny thing happened on the way to the Promised Land.

For years, blues lovers dreamed of the day when we could celebrate together, without regard for the small-minded prejudices that for so long made it impossible to celebrate freely. A lot of folks still remember the way it used to be, especially in the South. Musicians risked their lives if they toured in integrated buses. Even sharing a stage might touch off a riot – white musicians who sat in with black bands, or black sidemen who accompanied a white headliner, sometimes had to play hidden behind a curtain. Some clubs had a rope running down the middle of the floor, separating the races. On a good night the rope might eventually get pulled down and everyone would dance together – a harbinger of a liberated new world yet to come.

White kids who bought blues records or listened to the blues on the radio in the ‘40s, ‘50s, and early ‘60s might be punished by their parents, ridiculed by their peers, and lectured by their clergy. Racist organizations like the White Citizens’ Council of Alabama urged white communities to boycott stores that sold “Negro records,” lest the “savage” rhythms and “screaming, idiotic words” corrupt the lily-white purity of Caucasian youth. Their efforts succeeded all too well: black artists who enjoyed household-name status among black listeners were, for the most part, virtually unknown to whites. About the only way a black blues or R&B artist could have a “mainstream” hit was for a white artist to record a cover version, and even then the royalties and recognition seldom made it back to the source. “Separate and unequal” was the unwritten law of the land, and it was replicated in the world of music.

We’ve come a long way since then – in fact, in many ways we’ve come full-circle. Not only do many modern blues festivals, concerts, awards ceremonies, and clubs look like an integrationist’s dream; these days “color-blindness” has come to mean insisting that white musicians not be discriminated against (if that’s not an oxymoron) on the blues stage, on the radio show, or in the critical commentary. What used to be called black music – blues, jazz, R&B, even rap and hip-hop – is seldom even called that any more. Living Blues Magazine, the oldest continuous blues-based periodical in the U.S., has in recent years come under increasing fire for its insistence to remain –as its masthead proclaims– “The Journal Of The Afro-American Blues Tradition.” A newer magazine, Blues Revue, has pointedly flaunted its putative “color-blind” policy by billing itself as "The Blues Resource for All of America;" its masthead now proclaims it "The World's Blues Magazine." Guitarist Bob Margolin, a white musician who played for years in the Muddy Waters band, has written a column for Blues Revue that has expanded and elaborated on the argument that the blues – and music in general – has no intrinsic “color” or “ethnicity” (at least not anymore), and should be listened to and appreciated in that spirit. Another white guitarist, Elvin Bishop, titled one of his CDs The Skin I’m In as a pointed jab –really, a gauntlet thrown down – to those who’d question his authenticity as a bluesman.

And it’s all, of course, going on in the name of the most well-meaning and progressive social agendas – after all, isn’t this what “diversity” is supposed to be about? Just as long-neglected black artists received at least a modicum of their due in the newly enlightened atmosphere of the ‘60s and ‘70s, many whites– session musicians, songwriters, even some front-line entertainers – are now being acknowledged for the contributions they’ve been making to blues and R&B for decades.

Alongside these developments, though, there’s a rising tide of opinion suggesting that something precious is being lost – or even stolen. Where some see integration, others see dilution; where some praise colorblind diversity, others charge cultural imperialism. It’s not merely an academic issue: on bandstands, in the media, and among friends, battle lines are being drawn, accusations being made.
Artists find themselves caught between ideological camps. White musicians who genuinely love the blues and play it with integrity and heart feel as if they’re being treated as interlopers or even cultural thieves; they feel as if they’re being asked, unfairly, to pay dues for the sins of the past. On the other side of the divide, African American musicians who proclaim the ethnic and cultural identity of their art are sometimes accused of “reverse racism” and knee-jerk Afrocentrism. But if they incorporate pop and rock influences into their styles, or work in integrated bands, they’re open to charges of selling out. Critics and journalists, as well as the publications for which they work, may be labeled racist, regardless of which side they take in the debate.

Name-calling gets us nowhere, of course. But in a world where a handful of (white-dominated) corporations control virtually everything we see on television, hear, and read; where national debates rage over multiculturalism, bilingualism, Ebonics, and “identity politics”; where Third World countries and even European nations such as France are beginning to resent the intrusion of American mass culture that threatens the survival of cherished traditions and values – in such a world, idealistic visions of “free choice” and sharing cannot be separated from issues of equity and justice. To portray contemporary American race and class relations as equal – even in the music world– is disingenuous at best. It obscures very real inequities in power – inequities that threaten to weaken, if not destroy, the cultural and historical context in which the blues has developed over the years.

This is not to deny, of course, that any artist with integrity and talent can create music of merit, regardless of his or her cultural background. The issue at hand has nothing to do with whether or not individuals can transcend cultural barriers; it’s not about who has a “right” to play the blues, or whether the music of Jonny Lang, the North Mississippi Allstars, or the late Stevie Ray Vaughan is “authentic.” After all, some of the most vital and lasting music of the 20th Century was created by artists who melded their own cultural heritages with elements drawn from diverse traditions. Think, for instance, of African-American divas Marian Anderson and Leontyne Price performing European classical music alongside traditional Negro spirituals and folk songs; Paul Robeson singing Broadway show tunes, Hasidic chants and German lieder; Ray Charles and Aretha Franklin reinterpreting the works of pop songwriters like Paul Simon or Lennon and McCartney (who themselves drank deeply from multicultural wells); Elvis Presley and Carl Perkins fusing country music and blues into rock & roll.

What’s going on in the blues these days, however, represents something different and ominous. It has to do with the belief, which seems to be held by many “mainstream” observers (including most critics and more than a few musicians), that music somehow exists in a realm of its own, separate from any historical or social context. There’s a movement, fueled in large part by the corporate entertainment industry, to redefine the blues as “just notes”or “just a feeling,” devoid of any social, cultural, or historical implications beyond the vapidly rebellious (and aggressively adolescent) stance we’ve come to associate with rock & roll.

This is, in many ways, a new phenomenon. In 1956, no less an authority than Elvis reminded his public that ”the colored folks have been singing and playing it just like I’m doing now, man, for more years than I know. I got it from them.” Throughout his life Elvis went out of his way to pay credit to Arthur Crudup, Fats Domino, Jackie Wilson, and other African-American artists who had inspired him and served as musical role models (and he also put his money where his curled-up mouth was, contributing generously to Wilson’s medical care after Jackie was felled by a stroke.)

Later in the ‘60s, at least some white blues-rockers made at least a tacit effort to recognize their debt to living African-American culture, as well as to the individual artists they emulated. When the Rolling Stones embarked on their first U.S. tour, they insisted on showcasing Chicago blues legend Howlin’ Wolf on their first American television appearance; when Memphis-born harmonica player Charlie Musselwhite moved to Chicago in the ‘60s, he settled on the South Side, in the same community as the African-American blues musicians whom he idolized. Admittedly, such cultural cross-pollinations sometimes manifested themselves in self-conscious “blue-eyed soul brother” posing; at their best, however, they resulted in music that borrowed, with respect and honesty, from a wide palette of sources and influences, and in doing so created sounds that were vibrant and of lasting artistic importance. (And in many cases, the artists never forgot where the music came from: In 1976, when The Band performed their famous “Last Waltz” farewell concert at Winterland in San Francisco, someone associated with the project tried to cut Muddy Waters from the bill. Drummer Levon Helm was ouitraged: he stated that if Muddy wasn’t going to appear, neither would he. He personally forced the “suits” to include Muddy, his friend and mentor, on the show.)

The diminution of this perspective has been so gradual, and so insidious, that casual observers may not even realize how pervasive it has been. After all, most people still affirm that the earliest blues artists were African-American, and that their music evolved from traditions that extended back to slavery and to Africa before that. We take it as a given that this music led directly to electrified blues, R&B, and rock & roll. We even acknowledge that many of the social and cultural elements of what might be termed “the blues life” are rooted in historical and social conditions that have been experienced by African-Americans from the earliest days of bondage into the modern era.

But that’s “history” – and in America, when we say something is history we usually mean it’s a dead issue. Today, when contemporary white blues artists like Margolin or harpist Jerry Portnoy acknowledge their debt to a mentor like Muddy Waters or Big Walter Horton, it’s usually understood that they’re referring to an individual who happens to have been African American. Considerations such as the historical, social, and cultural milieu in which this individual lived; the role this milieu played in how this individual developed his or her art; the function of this art as a cultural expression within an indigenous (and oppressed) community; and the ways in which this expression was received, understood, and eventually appropriated by the dominant culture, are seldom considered. The problem is not, in other words, that nobody remembers where the
blues came from; rather, where the blues came from has been redefined and individualized to a point of almost total abstraction.

This willfully ignores a reality that a lot of whites still don’t want to confront: the relationship of Euro-American culture to most other cultures has historically been exploitative and imperialist. More to the point, this basic power imbalance has not changed; it continues to inform the allegedly “free” exchange of values and ideas that proponents of color-blind blues would have us believe exists today. You can’t have “freedom” without equality, and equality entails more than the bromides of well-meaning individuals who call each other “brothers and sisters” in recording studios or on stage.

Social equality (or inequality) occurs among groups –races, classes, genders, etc.– and must be understood and addressed on that level. A few Marian Andersons or Leontyne Prices don’t threaten anyone’s cultural status quo – no one is about to forget the European roots of opera. But, perhaps through no intentional fault of their own, a generation or two of corporate-sponsored white blues artists, with well-greased access to media and dollars, now threaten to obscure the historical and cultural significance of a music created, and still played, largely by people who do not share equally in the access to the means of cultural production and dissemination.

The imperialist overtones become more obvious when we consider that even as the music industry itself has moved away from acknowledging indigenous African-American culture as the original and still-fertile birthing ground of blues expression, others have rushed in to appropriate this culture and transform it into a commodity. Chambers of Commerce, local governments, and travel agencies have cashed in on blues “authenticity” by promoting blues tours and pub crawls into areas and neighborhoods they would otherwise advise white people to avoid at all costs. Camera-toting tourists now regularly show up at “exotic” venues ranging from backwoods Mississippi jukes too after-hours joints on the west side of Chicago, hungry for a taste of the thrilling and forbidden “real thing.” You almost expect the tour guides to be decked out in safari suits and pith helmets.

With all that going on, it seems disingenuous to then claim that the blues has somehow become a “color-blind” art form with no significant ties to a particular cultural heritage or living tradition. There may be nothing quite so cool as a Saturday night at the ol’ juke joint, but after we get back home (or safely back inside the white-owned nightclub that sponsored the tour), it seems that it suddenly becomes racist (or at least ethnocentric) to suggest that there’s something specific to the African-American experience that gave rise to the music we heard there.

The phenomenon isn’t limited to the blues, of course, and it’s possible that as it begins to be felt among what remains of other indigenous living cultures, we may see more widespread resistance to some of its more unfortunate effects. In recent years, for instance, Klezmer music –the improvisational ensemble playing that evolved out of the Jewish shtetls and ghettos of the late 19th and early 20th centuries– has become trendy. At present, everyone seems happy about this development. Jews are proud that this rich and soul-stirring musical heritage has found wider acceptance; everyone else is delighted to have discovered a new lode of aesthetic and emotional uplift. But if, in a decade or so, the Klezmer scene becomes dominated by a bunch of red-haired Irish kids named Duffy who name their bands “Little Moishe and the Lower East Side Bagel Kings,” pose for CD covers in front of Kosher delis sporting newsboy caps and dark glasses, and persist in telling interviewers that this music is, after all, “just notes” or “just a feeling” that anyone can play, the Jewish community may rightfully begin to wonder what’s being appropriated, what’s being defiled, and what remains for them to celebrate and honor as their own.

Likewise, if current trends continue, the very notion of the blues as the cultural expression of a particular people who lived and created their art in a particular historical epoch will have evaporated within a generation or two.

Again, this doesn’t mean that any kind of music or art is, or should be, off limits to anyone. But it also means that if we’re to understand and appreciate it with honesty and integrity, we need to acknowledge and pay tribute to the true cultural meaning and context of art. In other words, let’s learn to celebrate music as a manifestation of living history, as an expression not only of individuals but of the cultural and historical experiences they and their ancestors have shared. Let those of us who are blessed with the privilege of being received as honored guests in a culture not our own embrace this privilege with humility and grace as well as with creativity and innovation. Let us always strive to honor the spirit, the history, and the meaning behind the music, not just the “feelings” and the notes. Let’s not propagate cultural dilution –or, at its most extreme, cultural genocide– disguised as integration and color-blind liberalism.
Attachments area

Read more…

Music Submission Tips & Truths" By Cassie J Fox

Labels,Artists & Artists Representatives-Here are "Music Submission Tips & Truths"-Ive compiled these Tips & Truths after many years of experience in broadcasting,& In the music business. Discussions with many show hosts and broadcasters/station Program Directors, Record Labels, Promoters. 
TIP & TRUTH#1- When submitting music for the FIRST time to a radio show host,a streaming service,to be considered for airplay. 
Please -LISTEN to the Show or Stations Format to See or HEAR if Your Music fits the shows or stations' format.IF You DONOT Hear Music that Sounds like Your tracks-Then donot send it. Move on to a show or station that does play music that sounds like yours or your artists. It will Save So Much Time for all involved. 
2nd BIG TIP & TRUTH- For New New & First Time Artist/Music Submissions-Please DONOT send links to NON-Downloadable songs from I-Tunes, Reverb Nation, My Space,or You Tube. Theformat of those listed above willnot work with some Radio Show hosts, nor Fit their software. These tools are Excellent Promotional tools, but these video formats donot fit most broadcast software.
Visual & Audio tools like I-Tunes or Reverb are work best for you, when you submit these to a Record Label,a Show Promoter, Festival, or Venue Owner. Most Radio Broadcasters Require a HIGH Quality Recording of a Recorded Audio Track. 
*TIP & TRUTH #3-*Please send to a Show host's an E-Mail address-an EPK-Electronic Press kit, Mp3 & WAV are Industry standard. 
(I Prefer mp3 files only or a CD, which as been properperly labeled & encoded). 
The EPK should have a brief bio, discography, & description of the music & its format,&Artists or Label Contact Info. If it is a new artist-discography may or may not be present, due to a limited track record. .
** TIP&TRUTH #4- send any Un-Labeled, Non-Digitally Encoded tracks. The tracks MUST show titles in the Broadcast software. Did you KNow that Internet & Terrestrial Stations Owners/Managers PAY A Monthly fee to Stream A Broadcast?
The song must have the title & artist names digitally encoded in order for the Broadcast Software to read the digital encoding In Order To Send info to the Publishing Companies like BMI, ASCAP, SECAC & more. The proper credits go to Publisher/Writer/Recording Artist to receive Royalties/Residual Payments,& Other "Mechanical Type fees*See Sound Exchange*
TIP & TRUTH #5-The same labeling information is required for compact discs. Each track needs to be digitally encoded. This is for "Extraction/Ripping" The contents Into Broadcast software. 
Un-Labeled tracks more than likely WILLNOT be considered for airplay. The Show Host & Music & Program Director has many other duties with programming a station or a show than to spend their TIME Labeling YOUR Or YOUR Artists' Material. Some show hosts & PD's MD's report to Industry Trade Magazines & Charts. Correct Information is a MUST if you want to see your artist's song in a reported playlist. . 
It is Your or Your representatives or record producer/engineer's , responsibility to label tracks.Its Your responsibility to compile facts about your talent,your Music career in a brief bio. 
Again, do yourself or your artists' a great favor,Invest & create a EPK-Electronic press Kit with MP3 files or downloadable folder attached, website info,social media links,contact numbers, e-mail address in your bio or EPK. It make you Or Your artist look professional and career oriented as opposed to being labeled as an Amateur.

"Soul Of The Blues With Cassie CJ Fox " on Our Generation Radio.Com WOGR-DB  & Spice Internet Radio.Com -WSIR-DB  
Facebook: www.facebook.com/cassie.j.fox


Visit The Boogie Report at: http://boogiesmusicreporters.ning.com/?xg_source=msg_mes_network

 
Read more…

SOUL IS BACK!!

WHEN I WAS TOLD OVER A YEAR AGO BY SOMEONE IN THE BUSINESS,WHO MAKE THIER LIVING SELLING MUSIC AND RECORDING PERFORMERS IN THIS BUSINESS OF MUSIC.THAT THE SOUTHERN SOUL MUSIC WAS GOOD AS GONE OR DEAD .ME BEING A DIE HARD!!! TRUTHFULLY I THOUGHT THE DOWN SPIRROW
WOULD ONLY BE TEMPORARY .JUST HERE LATELY I HAD A CONVERSATION WITH HIM.I SAID TO HIM YOU WERE RIGHT!!!HE CASUALLY SAID I TOLD YOU SO,AND WENT ON TALKING ABOUT OTHER THINGS GOING ON IN THE BIZ....LIKE YOUTUBE GETTING A SPOT IN BILLBOARD.ARE CHARTS IMPORTANT?? I'LL LET YOU DECIDE
THAT FOR YOURSELF.....BUT I KNOW THEY ARE..MAGAZINE OR INTERNET.NOW TO GET DOWN TO WHY I WANT TO POST THIS ARTICLE............
THE ERA OF SOUTHERN SOUL IS FAST FADING FROM WHAT IT USE TO BE.......
IF YOUR IN THE BUSINESS OF SELLING OR PERFORMING
SOUTHERN SOUL MUSIC,I BELIEVE YOU ALREADY KNOW THAT.....QUESTION IS WHAT DO WE DO FOR ERA TO BE REMEMBERED.REQUEST A SIX PACK OF COMMON SENSE.WHICH BY THE WAY IS THE TITLE OF CARL SIMS NEW SINGLE SIX PACK OF COMMON SENSE .HE ALREADY MADE A VIDEO.GO TO YOUTUBE AND CHECK IT OUT.CARL SIMS SIX PACK OF COMMON SENSE.HE'S SMART ENOUGH TO KNOW .ANY VIDEO,BEATS NO VIDEO..THAT WAS SAID TO SAY THIS SOUTHERN SOUL ARTIST.MAKE VIDEO ON YOUR OLD BEST SONGS.POST ON YOUTUBE.THE SOUTHERN SOUL ERA MIGHT BE ROLLING OVER THE HILL.YOUR FACE ON VIDEO WILL NEVER DIE.YOU'LL ALWAYS BE REMEMBERED..MIGHT GET LUCKY..SELL A FEW VIDEO'S .BE AS CREATIVE AS POSSIBLE.DO LIKE SIR CHARLES,LACEE,VICK ALLEN, FALISA JANAYE,CARL SIMS,RONI THE SEXY LADY OF SOUTHERN SOUL.OLD SCHOOL DID IT! JUST DIDN'T DO IT ENOUGH...JOHNNY TAYLOR.TYRONE DAVIS.BOBBY BLAND,MARVIN SEASE,LITTLE MILTON,BOBBY RUSH,MILLIE JACKSON ,DENISE LASALLE,AND B.B. KING..IF I MISSED YOU? MAKE AND POST A VIDEO .
1CLEAN UP LYRICS FOR LARGER MARKETS AND RADIO AIR PLAY...BAD TASTE IN CONTENT IS ONE OF THE THINGS SOUTHERN SOUL.CAN DO WITH OUT!!.IN FACT

MY FRIENDS WILL SCREAM SELLOUT...BUT LET'S GO BACK TO SOUL! WHAT'S WRONG WITH THAT? THAT'S WHAT IT USE TO BE.THAT'S WHAT IT WILL ALWAYS BE
GOOD SONGS GET PLAYED EVERT DAY.MAKE GOOD SOUNDING TRACKS.NOW YOU HAVE A CHANCE....SONGS CROSS OVER WAY BEFORE ARTIST DO.
THANKS FOR LISTENING..IT'S YOUR MOVE!!!...SOUL IS BACK!!! THANK GOD IT NEVER WENT KNOW WHERE...GERALD "GYPSY"ROBINSON

Read more…

CONGRATULATIONS BOBBY RUSH

 Twenty years in the making, Decisions, the first collaboration between blues legend Bobby Rush and Southern California band Blinddog Smokin', featuring six-time Grammy winner Dr. John, is being rewarded with end-of-the-year music industry honors including a recent Grammy nomination in the Best Blues Album category.
Also this week, Bobby Rush picked up four Blues Music Awards from the Blues Foundation, including B.B. King Entertainer of the Year and Soul Blues Male Artist of the Year. Decisions secured a Best Soul Blues nod and Best Song nom for "Another Murder in New Orleans," written by Carl Gustafson and Donald Markowitz, performed by Rush and Dr. John w/Blinddog Smokin'.
Gustafson, the band leader, vocalist, and harmonica player of Blinddog Smokin,' says, "I'd really like to see people in the United States take a look at [Bobby Rush and Dr. John] and see what they have before they're gone, and feel their power, feel their love . . . Who knows how long Bobby or Mac are going to last? Now we have a chance. We have the two of them together for the first time in their careers, and they're two of the rarest characters in American music culture."
"Just to be in the running and to be involved is meaningful," says Rush on receiving his third Grammy nod. "It makes me feel like a winner already. I want to thank everyone in the category, the voters, and anyone that had anything to do with helping me get to where I am right now. I want to thank everyone from a fan standpoint and from a voter standpoint for everything they have done for Bobby Rush. I'm happy to be an old man but this makes me feel young again."
In October, Decisions won Best Soul Blues Album at the Blues BlastMusic Awards, where Rush was also singled out with a Lifetime Achievement Award. Decisions is the first-ever teaming on record of three unlikely friends united by their love of the blues — Rush and Malcolm John "Mac" Rebennack were both born in the same town of Homer, Louisiana.
Rush, 80 years old, continues his late-career emergence from the Chitlin' Circuit underground to music mainstream. His crossover arguably began after achieving a Grammy nomination in 2000 for his album Hoochie Man, being featured in the "Road to Memphis" segment of the 2004 Martin Scorcese documentary The Blues, and last year's Grammy-nominated record Down in Louisiana, which recently won Soul Blues Album of the Year at this year's Blues Music Awards.
Rush performed in July on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallonwith Dan Aykroyd and The Roots, as a part of the promo for the film Get On Up. Dan Aykroyd noted, "Okay, so like James Brown is gone, eh, and Richard Penniman a.k.a Little Richard … he's not going to tour no more, and B.B. King is slowing down. Bobby Rush is the last one left of that generation."MORE HERE"

Read more…

Meridian's rhythm & blues and soul music legacy will be recognized with a marker on the Mississippi Blues Trail.
The marker will be unveiled at 4 p.m. Thursday on lawn of the city hall.
David and Jimmy Ruffin, Al Wilson, Pat Brown, Eddie Houston, Patrice Moncell and George Soule are among the contributors to Meridian's music legacy who will be honored on the marker.
Many soul singers came out of the church, and, in Meridian, radio stations WTOK, WQIC, WMOX, WCOC and WOKK provided another training ground for musicians who worked as disc jockeys, recorded commercial jingles, and sometimes performed live on the air.
The Ruffin brothers left Meridian to become icons of the Motown sound of Detroit. David starred with the Temptations for years and both he and Jimmy were hitmakers during their solo careers as well. Meridian native Al Wilson moved to California, where he recorded his biggest hit, "Show and Tell," while Eddie Houston, Pat Brown and Patrice Moncell recorded in Mississippi. Brown scored a hit on the southern soul circuit with "Equal Opportunity," and Moncell was featured in the film "Last of the Mississippi Jukes."
George Soule worked a songwriter and session musician in Jackson and Muscle Shoals, Alabama, and had his own hit single on the soul charts in 1973 singing "Get Involved

Read more…
  • Michael Corbitt
  • Leslie  Jordan
  • Lucille Miller
  • Sarina Laurona
  • Harvey Johns      

                    WINNERS Of Tickets To The

           18th Annual Old School & Blues Festival

 YOU COULD BE THE NEXT WINNER JOIN BOOGIES TEXT CLUB TODAY ITS FREE AND ITS EASY JUST TEXT THE WORD "BOOGIE" TO 77948 NEXT WEEKS             PRIZE IS A $ 100.00 GIFT CERTIFICATE

                  FROM BOOGIES RECORD SHOP

Read more…

FLOYD TAYLOR GONE ON

Southern Soul Super Star Floyd Taylor, the son of the late blues and soul legend Johnnie Taylor has died at the age of sixty-years-old, according to a family friend.
Taylor, a Blues singer, had recently been touring with other musical acts across the country. His next show was slated for March 15, 2014 in Merrillville, Indiana at the Town Blues Festival.
The Taylor family has not officially commented on his death.
Story still developing..
In the meantime, check out a performance of Floyd singing with his father

Son of Johnnie Taylor, Floyd Singletary (Taylor), was born in Chicago and sang with a band at Dusable High School in Chicago, where he graduated. His first shows were at the Regal Theater in Chicago but Floyd held day jobs working at Children's Memorial Hospital and Mercy Hospital while waiting for his chance to follow in his father's footsteps.

The Taylor family has not officially commented on his death.
Story still developing..

More information from The Boogie Report as facts are released.......

Read more…

Support Nellie Tiger Travis

We The Members Of  Radio Broadcasters United 

would like to ask all radio music and program directors to support Nellie Tiger Travis in her fight

to stop Sub Standard Producers from messing up her song"Mr Sexy Man"

Please Play The Original

If You Need Service contact Nellie at The Boogie Report

http://boogiesmusicreporters.ning.com/profile/NellieTravis?xg_source=profiles_memberList

Read more…

Should We Do This ? Comments Requested

Before 1975 Black independent record producers would ship their products to one stops regional distribution centers all over America. These one stops would accept artist product initially on consignment, at the end of the buying cycle of store sales profits and remaining stored product would be returned to issuing company.

During the mid 60’s Columbia Records commissioned Harvard Business School to create a business model that would increase their revenues by eliminating the one stop distribution system, their by closing the open marketplace to independent record producers. This aggressive marketing plan left Black companies paralyzed with their only option to sign distribution deals as production units rather than actual record companies.

This plan was designed also to trap production companies with illogical contract stipulations that would later be prosecuted in Federal court. Successful independents, Stax executive Al Bell was set up with a fraudulent loan sighted as embezzlement. Columbia then absorbed the entire roster, in the case of Philadelphia International the label lost its most franchised artist. Other companies which did not sign distribution deals with Columbia were left without distribution links to retail outlets virtually ending establish companies with proven sales history.

The 21st century with the end of traditional brick and mortar record stores and the gateway to internet marketing presents an extraordinary opportunity to unite Hip Hop, Blues, and eventually Gospel venues under a African American combined controlled syndication for internet sales and Artist bookings.

To establish this task several media veterans: J.D.Black, Founder of the National Black Programmers Coalition along with other NBPC Board members Robert Rosenthal M.B.A. formerly of Philadelphia International Records and Universal Properties, Tommy Marshall formerly of Interscope Records, Boogie Blues Report Editor Jerry Mason, and Al Jenkins of Team Airplay Promotions have combined forces to accomplish this task starting at the forthcoming Boogie Report Conference to be held at Jackson, Mississippi. To secure a measurable presence from the Hip Hop communitity Shawn Jay-Z Carter will be asked to speak and to become

Plans have been devised to restore the presence of Black independent companies through creating an African American owned and controlled  on line purchasing link or download option of independent artist not represent ted with eBay sales or other similar on line sales organizations. We complete the circle this new collaboration is backed  by a network of market proven promotion professionals to work contracted artist product to radio (where applicable), to secure regular play at selected club venues  (increasing internet sales to our link).  The third component is offering booking agency services to radio stations catering in negotiating creative deposit and percentage arrangements.

Visit The Boogie Report at: http://boogiesmusicreporters.ning.com/?xg_source=msg_mes_network

 
Read more…

Bobby Blue Bland

We  Are  Sorry To Announce that we have confirmed the passing of Bobby Blue Bland
additional information as facts become available...

Robert Calvin "Bobby" Bland (born January 27, 1930), also known as Bobby "Blue" Bland, is an American singer of blues andsoul. He is an original member of the Beale Streeters,[1] and is sometimes referred to as the "Lion of the Blues". Along with such artists as Sam CookeRay Charles, and Junior Parker, Bland developed a sound that mixed gospel with the blues and R&B.[1]

Bobby Bland was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 1981, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1992, and received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1997.[2]

Visit The Boogie Report at: http://boogiesmusicreporters.ning.com/?xg_source=msg_mes_network

Read more…

Bobby Blue Bland

We  Are  Sorry To Announce that we have confirmed the passing of Bobby Blue Bland
additional information as facts become available...

Robert Calvin "Bobby" Bland (born January 27, 1930), also known as Bobby "Blue" Bland, is an American singer of blues andsoul. He is an original member of the Beale Streeters,[1] and is sometimes referred to as the "Lion of the Blues". Along with such artists as Sam CookeRay Charles, and Junior Parker, Bland developed a sound that mixed gospel with the blues and R&B.[1]

Bobby Bland was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 1981, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1992, and received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1997.[2]

Visit The Boogie Report at: http://boogiesmusicreporters.ning.com/?xg_source=msg_mes_network

Read more…

                          N-Da Know

            With Jazzii A

NOW Heard On BOOGIE RADIO

This Morning From 9  til Cst

                                        LISTEN and ENJOY

Read more…

RIP George Jackson

    Southern Soul Songwriter George Jackson Dies at 68

Songwriter George Jackson, co-author of "Old Time Rock and Roll" and hundreds of other soul, rock and rhythm and blues tunes, has died. He was 68.

Jackson died Sunday morning at his home in Ridgeland, a suburb of Jackson, said Thomas Couch Sr., board chairman of Malaco Records. Jackson had been sick with cancer for about a year.

"It was not unexpected, but it's always too soon," Couch said.

Born in Indianola, Miss., Jackson was writing songs by the time he was in his teens. It was Ike Turner who brought Jackson to New Orleans R&B pioneer Cosimo Matassa's studio in 1963, where he recorded his first song.

Jackson recorded dozens of singles in the 1960s and worked in Memphis, Tenn., but made his mark as a writer, beginning with FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, Ala. He later was a songwriter for crosstown rival Muscle Shoals Sound Studios before returning to Memphis. When Malaco bought Muscle Shoals Sound, it hired Jackson to write songs, said Wolf Stephenson, Malaco's vice president and chief engineer.

"George had hooks coming out of his ears," Stephenson said. "They weren't all hits, but I never heard him write a bad song. He never really got the recognition that's normally due a writer of his stature."

The Osmonds recorded Jackson's "One Bad Apple" in 1970, taking it to No. 1. Jackson and Thomas Jones III wrote "Old Time Rock and Roll," which Bob Seger recorded in 1978.

Stephenson said "Old Time Rock and Roll" is truly Jackson's song, and he has the tapes to prove it, despite Seger's claims that he altered it.

"Bob had pretty much finished his recording at Muscle Shoals and he asked them if they had any other songs he could listen to for the future," Stephenson said.

Besides Seger, the Osmonds and Ike and Tina Turner, Jackson's songs were also recorded by James Brown, Wilson Pickett and Clarence Carter. Later, he wrote "Down Home Blues" for Z.Z. Hill, a song which was a keystone for Malaco. The Mississippi label is a storehouse of soul, rhythm and blues and gospel music.

"He had a way of seeing things about life and saying them in a way that a lot of other people could relate to," Couch said.

Jackson's own vocal performances were mainly scattered over singles, although some have been collected into albums, including a 2011 reissue of his FAME recordings, "Don't Count Me Out," which won critical acclaim. That and other compilations were aimed at part at fans in the United Kingdom, where Stephenson said Jackson had a strong following.

Funeral arrangements were still being made.

Read more…